Theme: Reviving new aspects to explore the innovative strategies: The next decade in COPD

COPD 2017

COPD 2017

Conference Series LLC invites all the participants from all over the world to attend “4th International Conference on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease” during May 29-31, 2017 at Osaka, japan which includes prompt keynote presentations, Oral talks, Poster Presentations and Exhibitions and B2B Meetings.

Conference Series LLC organizes 1000+ Global Events inclusive of 300+ Conferences, 500+ Upcoming and Previous Symposiums and Workshops in USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific societies and publishes 700+ Open access journals which contains over 30000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

 COPD-2017 meeting provides a forum for researchers in the field to share advances in COPD related topics ranging from basic scientific research to biomarkers and clinical development, and it also throw a light on thought provoking topics and recent research in the field of lung related issues related to COPD.COPD-2017 is a trending conference which brings together efficient academic scientists, super specialists, young researchers, professors, and doctors making a perfect platform to gain experience, and evaluate emerging health care strategies across the globe to discuss about the COPD. COPD-2017 conference involve in organizing the International symposiums, B2B meetings, International workshops along with the keynote and plenary presentations to discuss the research scope in the field of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. OMICS International organizes a conference series of 1000+ Global Events inclusive of 300+ Conferences, 500+ Upcoming and Previous Symposiums and Workshops in USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific societies and publishes 700+ Open access journals which contains over 30000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

 Why to Attend???

COPD-2017 conference meeting provides a forum for researchers in the field to share advances in topics ranging from basic scientific research to biomarkers and clinical development in the field of COPD. This copd-2017 conference is the ideal event for networking and discussion on progress towards therapeutic potential in the particular COPD. This conference will feature a global audience of scientific leaders, academia and respiratory professionals, who are going to discuss today’s emerging treatments and diagnostics. By bringing together the pulmonary community, presenting the latest developments, and identifying unmet treatment needs, COPD-2017 hopes to accelerate research and drug development in COPD, improving patient outcomes.

Target Audience:

· Directors, Board Members, Presidents, Vice Presidents, Deans and Head of the Departments

· COPD Students, Scientists

· COPD Researchers

· COPD Faculty

·  Medical Colleges

·  COPD Associations and Societies

·  Business Entrepreneurs

·  Training Institutes

· Manufacturing Medical Devices Companies

·  Pharmaceutical Companies and Industries

·  Pulmonary Medicine and surgery related Companies

·  Laboratory Technicians

 

         We hope to see you in Osaka, Japan

Regards,

Organizing Committee,

COPD-2017

 

 

 

 

 

Track 1: Types of COPD

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease is characterized by obstruction of the airways and limitation to airflow. People with COPD have trouble breathing and shortness of breath.

The diseases that fall under the scope of COPD are: Chronic Bronchitis, Emphysema and COPD-Asthma overlap. Chronic Bronchitis causes inflammation and irritation of the airways, the tubes in your lungs where air passes through. When the air tubes are inflamed and irritated, thick mucus begins to form in them. Over time, this mucus plugs up airways and makes breathing difficult. When you cough this mucus up, the excretions are known as sputum, or phlegm. Emphysema is a common type of COPD in which the air sacs of the lungs become damaged, causing them to enlarge and burst. Damage in this area makes it difficult for people with emphysema to expel air from their lungs. This leads to a build-up of carbon dioxide in the body and a myriad of emphysema signs and symptoms. Asthma COPD Overlap Syndrome (ACOS) is usually characterized by increased reversibility of airflow obstruction, eosinophilic bronchial and systemic inflammation, and increased response to inhaled corticosteroids, compared with COPD patients. The relevance of the ACOS is the need to identify patients with COPD who may have underlying eosinophilic inflammation that responds better to inhaled corticosteroids. Until new diagnostic tools are developed, a previous diagnosis of asthma in a patient with COPD can be a reliable criterion to suspect ACOS in a patient with COPD.

Related Conference3rd Euro-Global Infectious Diseases Conferences September 5-6, 2016 Frankfurt, Germany; 3rd Euro-Global Emerging Infectious Diseases Conferences September 5-6, 2016 Frankfurt, Germany;4th Euro Global Conference on Infectious Diseases, October 16-18, 2017 Paris, France; 5th International Congress on Bacteriology and Infectious Diseases May 25-26, 2017 Chicago, USA; 2nd International Conference on Chest, March 24-26, 2017 Melbourne, Australia; 2nd International Conference on Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine, August 6-8, 2017 London, UK; 3rd world Congress on Infectious Disease, August 28-30, Philadelphia, USA; International Conference on American Thoracic Society, May 19-24, 2017, USA; Malaysian Thoracic Society Annual Congress, 28–30 July 2016 Hyogo, Japan; 58th Annual Meeting of the Japan Lung Cancer Society 4–15 October 2017, Japan; World Sleep 2017 October 6-7, Prague, Czech Republic; Australian & New Zealand Society of Cardiac & Thoracic Surgeons Annual Scientific Meeting, 6–9 November 2016 Queensland, Australia

Track 2: Signs and Symptoms of COPD

COPD symptoms are classified into Typical and non-typical type, which includes Chronic Cough, wheezing and shortness of breath and fatigue associated with sputum productions and the amount of sputum produced can change over hours to days. Typically the shortness of breath is worse on exertion of a prolonged duration and worsens over time. In the advanced stages, it occurs during rest and may be always present. It is a source of both anxiety and a poor quality of life in those with COPD. Many people with more advanced COPD breathe through pursed lips and this action can improve shortness of breath in some. Non Typical symptoms associated with Haemoptysis which can occur due to COPD, and also continuous expectoration of purulent sputum along with breathlessness without productive cough or wheezing. Clinical Features leads to high pressure on the lung arteries, which strains the right ventricle of the heart. This situation is referred to as corpulmonale, and leads to symptoms of leg swelling and bulging neck veins. Those with obstructed airflow may have wheezing or decreased sounds with air entry on examination of the chest with a stethoscope. A barrel chest is a characteristic sign of COPD.

Related Conference3rd Euro-Global Infectious Diseases Conferences September 5-6, 2016 Frankfurt, Germany; 3rd Euro-Global Emerging Infectious Diseases Conferences September 5-6, 2016 Frankfurt, Germany; 5th International Congress on Bacteriology and Infectious Diseases May 25-26, 2017 Chicago, USA; 3rd world Congress on Infectious Disease, August 28-30, Philadelphia, USA; 2nd International Congress on Rare Diseases and Orphan Drugs, October 16-18, 2017 San Antonio, USA; 4th Euro Global Conference on Infectious Diseases, October 16-18, 2017 Paris, France; 2nd International Conference on Chest, March 24-26, 2017 Melbourne, Australia; World Sleep 2017 October 6-7, Prague, Czech Republic; 74th Annual Congress of the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI) Oct 26-30, 2017 Boston, USA; 58th Annual Meeting of the Japan Lung Cancer Society 4–15 October 2017, Japan; 8th International Workshop on Pulmonary Functional Imaging  24–26 March 2017 Seoul, Korea; Better Breathing Conference Jan 26-28, 2017 Toronto, Canada

Track 3: Pathogenesis of COPD

Inflammation is present in the lungs, particularly the small airways, of all people who smoke. This normal protective response to the inhaled toxins is amplified in COPD, leading to tissue destruction, impairment of the defence mechanisms that limit such destruction, and disruption of the repair mechanisms. In general, the inflammatory and structural changes in the airways increase with disease severity and persist even after smoking cessation. Besides inflammation, two other processes are involved in the pathogenesis of COPD—an imbalance between proteases and antiproteases and an imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants (oxidative stress) in the lungs. Multiple pathogenetic mechanisms likely contribute to the development of COPD. The most important risk factor is cigarette smoking, which can affect the lungs by a variety of mechanisms. Other exposures also contribute, probably through similar pathways. Factors in addition to exposures, including both genetic and acquired conditions, also play a role and likely account for much of the variable susceptibility of individuals to the effects of cigarette smoke and other exposures. Advances in understanding the pathogenesis of COPD have the potential for identifying new therapeutic targets that could alter the natural history of this devastating disorder.

Related Conference: 3rd Euro-Global Infectious Diseases Conferences September 5-6, 2016 Frankfurt, Germany; 3rd Euro-Global Emerging Infectious Diseases Conferences September 5-6, 2016 Frankfurt, Germany; 2nd International Conference on Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine, August 6-8, 2017 London, UK; 3rd International Conference on Influenza, September 11-13, 2017 Zurich, Switzerland; International Conference on Pulmonary Disorders, April 20-21, 2017 Las Vegas, USA; 2nd International Conference on Chest, March 24-26, 2017 Melbourne, Australia; 4th Euro Global Conference on Infectious Diseases, October 16-18, 2017 Paris, France; International Conference on American Thoracic Society, May 19-24, 2017, USA; Malaysian Thoracic Society Annual Congress, 28–30 July 2016 Hyogo, Japan; Australian & New Zealand Society of Cardiac & Thoracic Surgeons Annual Scientific Meeting, 6–9 November 2016 Queensland, Australia; Better Breathing Conference Jan 26-28, 2017 Toronto, Canada; 8th International Workshop on Pulmonary Functional Imaging  24–26 March 2017 Seoul, Korea

Track 4: Pathophysiology of COPD

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by poorly reversible airflow obstruction and an abnormal inflammatory response in the lungs. The latter represents the innate and adaptive immune responses to long term exposure to noxious particles and gases, particularly cigarette smoke. All cigarette smokers have some inflammation in their lungs, but those who develop COPD have an enhanced or abnormal response to inhaling toxic agents. This amplified response may result in mucous hypersecretion, tissue destruction, and disruption of normal repair and defence mechanisms causing small airway inflammation and fibrosis (bronchiolitis). These pathological changes result in increased resistance to airflow in the small conducting airways, increased compliance of the lungs, air trapping, and progressive airflow obstruction—all characteristic features of COPD. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathological changes found in COPD. Parenchymal destruction is associated with loss of lung tissue elasticity, which occurs as a result of destruction of the structures supporting and feeding the alveoli (emphysema). This means that the small airways collapse during exhalation, impeding airflow, trapping air in the lungs and reducing lung capacity. Additionally, inflammation associated with COPD causes damage to the mucociliary transport system which is responsible for clearing mucus from the airways. Both these factors contribute to excess mucus in the airways which eventually accumulates, blocking them and worsening airflow.

Related Conference: 3rd Euro-Global Infectious Diseases Conferences September 5-6, 2016 Frankfurt, Germany; 3rd Euro-Global Emerging Infectious Diseases Conferences September 5-6, 2016 Frankfurt, Germany; 5th International Congress on Bacteriology and Infectious Diseases May 25-26, 2017 Chicago, USA; International Conference on Pulmonary Disorders, April 20-21, 2017 Las Vegas, USA; 2nd International Conference on Chest, March 24-26, 2017 Melbourne, Australia; 3rd International Conference on Influenza, September 11-13, 2017 Zurich, Switzerland; 2nd International Conference on Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine, August 6-8, 2017 London, UK

Track 5: Management of COPD

COPD Management strategy consisting of combined pharmacotherapy and nonpharmacotherapeutic interventions can effectively improve symptoms, activity levels and quality of life at all levels of disease severity. Medical Management of COPD involves Oral and inhaled medications are used for patients with stable disease to reduce dyspnoea and improve exercise tolerance. Most of the medications used are directed at the four potentially reversible causes of airflow limitation in a disease state that has largely fixed obstruction. Beta2-agonist bronchodilators activate specific B2-adrenergic receptors on the surface of smooth muscle cells, which increases intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and smooth muscle relaxation. Theophylline is a bronchodilator and an anti-inflammatory agent. Surgical Management of COPD including the surgical interventions directed only to patients who remain symptomatic despite optimal medical treatment. There are numerous surgical interventions for the treatment of the hyper expanded and poorly perfused emphysematous lung; these include costochondrectomy, phrenic crush, pneumoperitoneum, pleural abrasion, lung denervation, and thoracoplasty. Nursing Management of COPD involves maintaining adequate nutrition, the nurse explores the patient’s and family’s usual dietary habits and counsels the patient to select foods that provide a high-protein, high-calorie diet. The nurse encourages the patient to talk about anxiety and fears with family members and health care professionals. The nurse should foster a realistic assessment of abilities and limitations, with a focus on those activities the patient is still able to do. Positive body responses should be stressed without negating the seriousness of the health issues involved. Vocational rehabilitation may be an option for some patients. It is important to counsel the patient to select foods that derive their calories from high fat rather than high carbohydrate levels. Persons with advanced chronic bronchitis or emphysema are unable to exhale the excess carbon dioxide that is a natural end product of carbohydrate metabolism may elevate paco2 levels.

Related Conference: 3rd Euro-Global Infectious Diseases Conferences September 5-6, 2016 Frankfurt, Germany; 3rd Euro-Global Emerging Infectious Diseases Conferences September 5-6, 2016 Frankfurt, Germany; 3rd International Conference on Influenza, September 11-13, 2017 Zurich, Switzerland; International Conference on Pulmonary Disorders, April 20-21, 2017 Las Vegas, USA; 4th Euro Global Conference on Infectious Diseases, October 16-18, 2017 Paris, France; 3rd world Congress on Infectious Disease, August 28-30, Philadelphia, USA; 5th International Congress on Bacteriology and Infectious Diseases May 25-26, 2017 Chicago, USA; World Sleep 2017 October 6-7, Prague, Czech Republic; 58th Annual Meeting of the Japan Lung Cancer Society 4–15 October 2017, Japan; Better Breathing Conference Jan 26-28, 2017 Toronto, Canada; Malaysian Thoracic Society Annual Congress, 28–30 July 2016 Hyogo, Japan; International Conference on American Thoracic Society, May 19-24, 2017, USA

Track 6: Complications Associated with COPD

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) refers to a collection of lung diseases that can lead to blocked airways. People with COPD can be at risk for some serious complications that can not only put their health in jeopardy, but can also fatal. In COPD patients, Pneumonia occurs when bacteria enter the lungs, creating an infection. For COPD patients, pneumonia can weaken the lungs. This can lead to a chain reaction of illnesses that can weaken the lungs even further. This downward spiral can lead to a rapid deterioration of health in COPD patients. Respiratory Insufficiency is an important complication of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This may represent deterioration in the patient's premorbid condition such that hypoxemia worsens and hypercapnia develops during a relatively trivial respiratory tract infection, which may be viral or bacterial, Alternatively, these changes may occur for the first time in someone with less severe COPD who encounters a particularly dramatic cause for deterioration, e.g. lobar pneumonia or acute pulmonary oedema. Pneumothorax is defined as the accumulation of air or gas in the space between the lung and the chest wall. Also known as a collapsed lung, pneumothorax occurs when a hole develops in the lung that allows air to escape in the space around the lung, causing the lungs to partially or completely collapse. People with COPD, are at greater risk for pneumothorax because the structure of their lungs is weak and vulnerable to the spontaneous development of these types of holes. Pneumo mediastinum must be differentiated from spontaneous pneumothorax. Patients may or may not have symptoms, as this is typically a well-tolerated disease, although mortality in cases of esophageal rupture is very high.

Related Conference: 3rd Euro-Global Infectious Diseases Conferences September 5-6, 2016 Frankfurt, Germany; 3rd Euro-Global Emerging Infectious Diseases Conferences September 5-6, 2016 Frankfurt, Germany; 3rd world Congress on Infectious Disease, August 28-30, Philadelphia, USA; 4th Euro Global Conference on Infectious Diseases, October 16-18, 2017 Paris, France; International Conference on Pulmonary Disorders, April 20-21, 2017 Las Vegas, USA; 3rd International Conference on Influenza, September 11-13, 2017 Zurich, Switzerland; 2nd International Conference on Chest, March 24-26, 2017 Melbourne, Australia; International Conference on American Thoracic Society, May 19-24, 2017, USA; Australian & New Zealand Society of Cardiac & Thoracic Surgeons Annual Scientific Meeting, 6–9 November 2016 Queensland, Australia; 8th International Workshop on Pulmonary Functional Imaging  24–26 March 2017 Seoul, Korea; 74th Annual Congress of the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI) Oct 26-30, 2017 Boston, USA; World Sleep 2017 October 6-7, Prague, Czech Republic

Track 7: CO-Morbidities in COPD

Comorbidities are two or more diseases existing at the same time in the body. They are common for people with COPD because organ systems work differently when they do not receive enough oxygen. When a resulting condition occurs, it can be considered comorbidity. Comorbidities are also difficult to manage for people who have COPD. Comorbidities are also difficult to manage for people who have COPD, Comorbidities such as cardiac disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, osteoporosis, and psychological disorders are commonly reported in patients with COPD. Vascular and Heart diseases are among the most important comorbidities observed in COPD, because they have a direct impact on patient survival. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the vascular alterations observed in COPD. COPD patients with the Nutritional Disorders lower body mass indexes and greater depletion of lean body mass than do COPD patients with chronic bronchitis. Nonetheless, skeletal muscle weakness is associated with wasting of extremity fat-free mass (FFM) in COPD patients, independent of airflow obstruction and COPD subtype, and Poor nutritional status in COPD patients has been related to adverse effects that may contribute to complications and increased mortality. In COPD, Muco skeletal Disorders is characterized by reduced muscle strength, reduced muscle endurance, and the presence of muscle fatigue. The estimated overall prevalence of skeletal muscle weakness in patients with COPD was shown to be 32%. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are at increased risk for both the development of primary lung cancer, as well as poor outcome after lung cancer diagnosis and treatment. Endothelial dysfunction and increased arterial stiffness begin early in the course of COPD and probably represent the onset of atherosclerotic disease. Similarly, proven airway obstruction is associated with a higher frequency of generalised anxiety disorder or panic disorder. Depression affects between 20% and 60% of COPD patients depending on the study, COPD stage and the scale used.

Related Conference: 3rd Euro-Global Infectious Diseases Conferences September 5-6, 2016 Frankfurt, Germany; 3rd Euro-Global Emerging Infectious Diseases Conferences September 5-6, 2016 Frankfurt, Germany; 2nd International Congress on Rare Diseases and Orphan Drugs, October 16-18, 2017 San Antonio, USA; International Conference on Pulmonary Disorders, April 20-21, 2017 Las Vegas, USA; 5th International Congress on Bacteriology and Infectious Diseases May 25-26, 2017 Chicago, USA; 4th Euro Global Conference on Infectious Diseases, October 16-18, 2017 Paris, France; 2nd International Conference on Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine, August 6-8, 2017 London, UK; 8th International Workshop on Pulmonary Functional Imaging  24–26 March 2017 Seoul, Korea; 58th Annual Meeting of the Japan Lung Cancer Society 4–15 October 2017, Japan; Australian & New Zealand Society of Cardiac & Thoracic Surgeons Annual Scientific Meeting, 6–9 November 2016 Queensland, Australia; International Conference on American Thoracic Society, May 19-24, 2017, USA; Malaysian Thoracic Society Annual Congress, 28–30 July 2016 Hyogo, Japan

Track 8: Epidemiology of COPD

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is responsible for early mortality, high death rates and significant cost to health systems. Active smoking remains the main risk factor, but other factors are becoming better known, such as occupational factors, infections and the role of air pollution. Prevalence of COPD varies according to country, age and sex. This disease is also associated with significant comorbidities. COPD is a disorder that includes various phenotypes, the continuum of which remains under debate. Risk factors for developing COPD may be divided into two categories: exogenous (tobacco smoke, air pollution, work exposure, etc.) and endogenous (age, gender, genetic factors, etc.). Such factors, separately or in synergy, determine the subject’s susceptibility level for disease. Moreover, after adjusting for smoking, women exhibited a higher risk of being admitted to hospital for COPD than men. Tobacco smoking is the most important cause, but work exposure to noxious agents and air pollution play a remarkable role in the exacerbation and in the pathogenesis of chronic respiratory diseases, too. Thus, respiratory physicians, as well as public health professionals, should advocate for a cleaner environment.

Related Conference: 3rd Euro-Global Infectious Diseases Conferences September 5-6, 2016 Frankfurt, Germany; 3rd Euro-Global Emerging Infectious Diseases Conferences September 5-6, 2016 Frankfurt, Germany; 4th Euro Global Conference on Infectious Diseases, October 16-18, 2017 Paris, France; 3rd world Congress on Infectious Disease, August 28-30, Philadelphia, USA; 5th International Congress on Bacteriology and Infectious Diseases May 25-26, 2017 Chicago, USA; 3rd International Conference on Influenza, September 11-13, 2017 Zurich, Switzerland; International Conference on Pulmonary Disorders, April 20-21, 2017 Las Vegas, USA; 58th Annual Meeting of the Japan Lung Cancer Society 4–15 October 2017, Japan; 74th Annual Congress of the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI) Oct 26-30, 2017 Boston, USA; World Sleep 2017 October 6-7, Prague, Czech Republic; International Conference on American Thoracic Society, May 19-24, 2017, USA; Better Breathing Conference Jan 26-28, 2017 Toronto, Canada

Track 9: Diagnostic Evaluation of COPD

No changes in physical appearance are usually present with mild-to-moderate COPD. In advanced COPD, patients with emphysema may be wasted and thin, with normal-colored pink skin, while those with chronic bronchitis may have bluish lips and fingers, be obese, and may have swollen feet and legs. Breathing may be rapid and shallow, done through pursed lips, with prolonged exhales. Common differential diagnosis of COPD includes clinical history; physical examination; and diagnostic testing, such as lung function measurements, can help diagnose COPD. Chest radiography may rule out alternative diagnoses and comorbid conditions. Patients with COPD often present with diminished with Physical Examination which includes breath sounds, prolonged expiratory time, and expiratory wheezing that initially may occur only on forced expiration. Additional findings on physical examination include hyperinflation of the lungs with an increased anteroposterior chest diameter (“barrel chest”). Patients with more advanced disease may have pursed lip breathing or postures that relieve dyspnea. The presence of significant edema may indicate right-sided heart failure and cor-pulmonale in patients with pulmonary hypertension from severe long-standing COPD. Chest x-rays are rarely useful for diagnosing chronic bronchitis, although they sometimes show mild scarring and thickened airway walls. Non-invasive Methods for Determining Severity, and also the short exercise tests are very useful for determining the severity of COPD.

Related Conference: 3rd Euro-Global Infectious Diseases Conferences September 5-6, 2016 Frankfurt, Germany; 3rd Euro-Global Emerging Infectious Diseases Conferences September 5-6, 2016 Frankfurt, Germany; 2nd International Congress on Rare Diseases and Orphan Drugs, October 16-18, 2017 San Antonio, USA; 5th International Congress on Bacteriology and Infectious Diseases May 25-26, 2017 Chicago, USA; 3rd world Congress on Infectious Disease, August 28-30, Philadelphia, USA; 4th Euro Global Conference on Infectious Diseases, October 16-18, 2017 Paris, France; 2nd International Conference on Chest, March 24-26, 2017 Melbourne, Australia; Malaysian Thoracic Society Annual Congress, 28–30 July 2016 Hyogo, Japan; International Conference on American Thoracic Society, May 19-24, 2017, USA; 58th Annual Meeting of the Japan Lung Cancer Society 4–15 October 2017, Japan; 74th Annual Congress of the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI) Oct 26-30, 2017 Boston, USA; World Sleep 2017 October 6-7, Prague, Czech Republic

Track 10: COPD Therapeutics At Stages

The symptoms of COPD cannot be completely eliminated with treatment and the condition usually worsens over time. However, treatment can control symptoms and can sometimes slow the progression of the disease. Medications that help open the airways, called bronchodilators, are a mainstay of treatment for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Bronchodilators help to keep airways open and possibly decrease secretions. Short-acting anticholinergic medication (ipratropium, Atrovent) improves lung function and symptoms. If symptoms are mild and infrequent, short-acting anticholinergic medication may be recommended only when you need it, and Long-acting beta agonists may be recommended if your symptoms are not adequately controlled with other treatments. Glucocorticoids taken in pill form or as an injection are sometimes used for short term treatment but are not generally used long-term because of the risk of side effects. Several such combinations are available including fluticasone proprionate/salmeterol (Advair) and budesonide/formoterol (Symbicort), which are taken twice daily, and fluticasone furoate/vilanterol (Breo), which is taken once daily. People with advanced COPD can have low oxygen levels in the blood. This condition, known as hypoxemia and the oxygen level can be measured with a device placed on the finger or with a blood test (arterial blood gas). Fatal fires have occurred in people attempting to smoke while using oxygen.  Unintended weight loss caused by shortness of breath usually occurs in people with more advanced lung disease. Not eating enough can lead to malnutrition, which can make symptoms worse and increase the likelihood of infection. Other treatments for COPD are including Noninvasive ventilatory support (the use of a special mask and breathing machine to improve symptoms), anti-anxiety or anti-depressant medications, or morphine-like medications to reduce shortness of breath.

Related Conference: 3rd Euro-Global Infectious Diseases Conferences September 5-6, 2016 Frankfurt, Germany; 3rd Euro-Global Emerging Infectious Diseases Conferences September 5-6, 2016 Frankfurt, Germany; 2nd International Congress on Rare Diseases and Orphan Drugs, October 16-18, 2017 San Antonio, USA; 5th International Congress on Bacteriology and Infectious Diseases May 25-26, 2017 Chicago, USA; 3rd International Conference on Influenza, September 11-13, 2017 Zurich, Switzerland; 3rd world Congress on Infectious Disease, August 28-30, Philadelphia, USA; 2nd International Conference on Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine, August 6-8, 2017 London, UK; International Conference on American Thoracic Society, May 19-24, 2017, USA; World Sleep 2017 October 6-7, Prague, Czech Republic; Malaysian Thoracic Society Annual Congress, 28–30 July 2016 Hyogo, Japan; 74th Annual Congress of the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI) Oct 26-30, 2017 Boston, USA; 8th International Workshop on Pulmonary Functional Imaging  24–26 March 2017 Seoul, Korea

Track 11: COPD Exacerbations

An acute exacerbation of COPD is a flare-up or episode when your breathing gets worse than usual and you become sick. It is most often linked to an infection. Exacerbations are often linked to a lung infection that results from a virus or bacteria, like a cold or some other illness. Spending time in smoggy or dirty air can also make your symptoms get worse quickly. Exacerbations Management may be accompanied by increased amount of cough and sputum productions, and a change in appearance of sputum. An abrupt worsening in COPD symptoms may cause rupture of the airways in the lungs, which in turn may cause a spontaneous pneumothorax. Preventing acute exacerbations Management helps to reduce long-term complications. Long-term oxygen therapy, regular monitoring of pulmonary function and referral for pulmonary rehabilitation are often indicated. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccines should be given. Patients who do not respond to standard therapies may benefit from surgery. Pulmonary Rehabilitations a programme of exercise and education for people with long-term lung conditions help to improve your muscle strength, so you can use the oxygen you breathe more efficiently, improve your general fitness and help you to cope better with feeling out of breath and also help you to feel to stronger and fitter, and able to do more PR is about helping you manage your condition better. It is not a cure, but you will feel better and more confident and in control. PR requires your commitment to really work. People who learn about their COPD and treatment plan are better able to recognize symptoms and take appropriate action. However, education is no substitute for regular exercise as part of a pulmonary rehab program.

Related Conference: 3rd Euro-Global Infectious Diseases Conferences September 5-6, 2016 Frankfurt, Germany; 3rd Euro-Global Emerging Infectious Diseases Conferences September 5-6, 2016 Frankfurt, Germany; 3rd International Conference on Influenza, September 11-13, 2017 Zurich, Switzerland; 2nd International Congress on Rare Diseases and Orphan Drugs, October 16-18, 2017 San Antonio, USA; 2nd International Conference on Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine, August 6-8, 2017 London, UK; International Conference on Pulmonary Disorders, April 20-21, 2017 Las Vegas, USA; 2nd International Conference on Chest, March 24-26, 2017 Melbourne, Australia; Australian & New Zealand Society of Cardiac & Thoracic Surgeons Annual Scientific Meeting, 6–9 November 2016 Queensland, Australia; Better Breathing Conference Jan 26-28, 2017 Toronto, Canada; 58th Annual Meeting of the Japan Lung Cancer Society 4–15 October 2017, Japan; 74th Annual Congress of the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI) Oct 26-30, 2017 Boston, USA; International Conference on American Thoracic Society, May 19-24, 2017, USA

Track 12: Self-Management and Prevention of COPD

Self- Management interventions help patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) acquire and practise the skills they need to carry out disease-specific medical regimens, guide changes in health behaviour and provide emotional support to enable patients to control their disease. These programmes are based on the presumption that effective modification of behaviour can be attained only if patients’ self-efficacy has been improved. Patients who have enough confidence in their ability to successfully respond to certain events, such as at the time of an exacerbation, can more easily modify and maintain the desired behaviour. The behavioural modification should ultimately result in improved clinical outcomes. COPD self-management programmes have shown positive effects on patients’ quality of life and healthcare use in secondary care settings, but the benefits in general practice are still inconclusive. There are also  breathing techniques that can help you get the air you need without working so hard to breathe, Our primary objective was to assess the long term effects of two different modes of COPD disease management—comprehensive self-management and routine monitoring—on quality of life in COPD patients in general practice. As secondary objectives, we assessed the effects on frequency and patients’ management of exacerbations and on self-efficacy.

Related Conference: 3rd Euro-Global Infectious Diseases Conferences September 5-6, 2016 Frankfurt, Germany; 3rd Euro-Global Emerging Infectious Diseases Conferences September 5-6, 2016 Frankfurt, Germany; 3rd world Congress on Infectious Disease, August 28-30, Philadelphia, USA; 4th Euro Global Conference on Infectious Diseases, October 16-18, 2017 Paris, France; 5th International Congress on Bacteriology and Infectious Diseases May 25-26, 2017 Chicago, USA; 2nd International Conference on Chest, March 24-26, 2017 Melbourne, Australia; 2nd International Conference on Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine, August 6-8, 2017 London, UK ; 74th Annual Congress of the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI) Oct 26-30, 2017 Boston, USA; Australian & New Zealand Society of Cardiac & Thoracic Surgeons Annual Scientific Meeting, 6–9 November 2016 Queensland, Australia; Better Breathing Conference Jan 26-28, 2017 Toronto, Canada; Malaysian Thoracic Society Annual Congress, 28–30 July 2016 Hyogo, Japan; International Conference on American Thoracic Society, May 19-24, 2017, USA

 

Summary:

COPD-2017 conference is a three-day programme of presentations, panel discussions and interactive dialogue at the conference on leading the way in the COPD research development, which took place from 29-31 May 2017 in Osaka, Japan. The event brought together Professors, researchers, and key officials and delegates from almost 50 countries to review the role in the COPD management and with an interactive talks and sessions, and workshops and symposiums in the current recent advancements in COPD strategies.

Importance & Scope:

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an important public health issue in many countries which is estimated to become the fifth cause of disability and the third cause of mortality in the world within 2020. Educating patients and physicians to recognize that cough, sputum production, and especially breathlessness are not trivial symptoms is an essential aspect of the public health care of this disease. This landmark study forms an additional foundation for the early history of smoking in order to identify abnormality and risk of progressive impairment on the pathway to symptomatic COPD. Unfortunately, only a small percentage of subjects were able to stop smoking for the full 5 years of this study; only 22% who received special care and 5% who received usual care were able to quit and stay abstinent. This study was done at a time when the only form of nicotine replacement was nicotine-containing chewing gum Thus, together, spirometric tests of smokers and symptomatic patients to identify abnormalities, the use of a growing number of smoking cessation strategies, and the possibility of other anti-inflammatory drugs to stem the rate of decline, offer a new approach for changing the course and outcome of COPD. This COPD-2017 conference aims at perfect opportunity for the people including Academicians and Business delegates across the globe to widen their knowledge in the field of COPD.

Why Osaka??

Osaka is a designated city in the Kansai region of Japan. It is the capital city of Osaka Prefecture and the largest component of the Keihanshin Metropolitan Area, the second largest metropolitan area in Japan and among the largest in the world with over 19 million inhabitants. Osaka is situated at the mouth of the Yodo River on Osaka Bay, Japan. Osaka has started to garner more attention from foreigners with the increased popularity of cooking and dining in popular culture.  Osaka Science Museum is in a five storied building next to the National Museum of Art, with a planetarium and an OMNIMAX theatre. The Museum of Oriental Ceramics holds more than 2,000 pieces of ceramics, from China, Korea, Japan and Vietnam, featuring displays of some of their Korean celadon under natural light. Osaka Municipal Museum of Artis inside Tennōji park, housing over 8,000 pieces of Japanese and Chinese paintings and sculptures. Due to its geographical position, Osaka's international ferry connections are far greater than that of Tokyo, with international service to Shanghai, Tianjin, Korea along with domestic routes to Kitakyushu, Kagoshima, Miyazaki and Okinawa.

Conference Highlights

Types of COPD

Signs and Symptoms of COPD

Pathogenesis of COPD

Pathophysiology of COPD

Management of COPD

COPD Complications

Co-Morbidities in COPD

Epidemiology of COPD

Diagnostic Evaluation of COPD

COPD Therapeutics

COPD Exacerbations

Self-Management and Prevention of COPD

 

Major COPD Research Associations around the Globe

Alpha-1 Foundation

American Association for Respiratory Care

American College of Chest Physicians

American College of Emergency Physicians

American College of Physicians

American Lung Association

Asian Pacific Society of Respirology

Associacion Argentina de Medicina Respiratoria

Association of Bulgarians with Bronchial Asthma (ABBA)

Asthma and Allergy Research Institute. Inc.

Brazilian COPD Patients Association

Breathe Easy India

Canadian COPD Alliance

Canadian Lung Association (CLA)

Chinese COPD Patient Education Organziation

COPD Club of Northern Thailand

COPD Foundation

COPD Patient Organization of Vietnam

COPD Patients Club Kyrgyzstan

COPD-ALERT

Czech Association Against COPD

Czech Civil Association against COPD

European Federation of Allergy and Airways Diseases Patients` Associations

Institute of Phthisiology/Pulmonology, Academy of Medical Science of the Ukraine

Italian Association of COPD Patients

Japan Federation of Patient Organizations for Respiratory Diseases

Japanese Respiratory Society

Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases

Kyrgyz Association for Asthma and COPD Patients

Lung Health Center

Lung Hospital

National Emphysema/COPD Association

National Institute of Chest Diseases & Bangladesh Lung Foundation

National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases

National University Hospital, Department of Medicine

Netherlands Asthma Foundation

Peruvian Chest Society

Polish Association of COPD Patients

Portuguese Respiratory Society

Portuguese Society of Pulmonology

Post Polio Respiratory Disorder Patient Group

Russian Respiratory Society

Russian States Medical University

South African Thoracic Society

Szeged University Medical School

The Australian Lung Foundation

The Swedish Heart and Lung Association

The Thoracic Society of Thailand

West Park Healthcare Centre

Russian Respiratory Society

 

Major Universities on COPD Research

Australian national university, Australia

Charles Darwin University Casoria Australia

Columbia University Medical  Center, United States

Curtin University Bentley, Australia

Dar Al Uloom University, Saudi Arabia

Harvard University, United States

Imperial College London, United Kingdom

Iqbal Chest Centre, Bangladesh

Johns Hopkins University, United States

Kindai University, Japan

Kumamoto University, Japan

Linnaeus University, Sweden

Macquarie University, Australia

Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, USA

McGill university   Montréal, Canada

Medi7 Bentleigh, Australia

Murdoch University   Murdoch, Australia

Philip Morris International R&D, Switzerland

Pompeu Fabra University, Spain

Research Institute of Hospital del Mar, Spain

St. George Hospital, Australia

Tasmanian Health Service, Australia

The Chest & Heart Association of Bangladesh, Bangladesh

The Fourth Hospital of Harbin Medical University, China

The Jikei University School of Medicine, Japan

Tufts university, United States

United Hospital, Bangladesh

University Of British Columbia, Canada

University Of Buffalo, United States

University of Canberra Bruce, Australia

University Of Chicago Medicine, United States

University Of Colorado, United States

University Of Groningen, Netherlands

University Of London Imperial College Of Science Technology And Medicine ,United Kingdom

University of Maastricht, Netherlands

University Of Maryland Medical  Center, United States

University Of Maryland Medical Center, Australia

University Of Minnesota, United States

University of Newcastle, Australia

University of Queensland, Australia

University of Tasmania, Australia

University Of Washington, United States

University Of  Melbourne, Australia

University Of  Toronto, Canada

University  Of California Los Angeles, United States

University  Of Pittsburgh, United States

University  Of  Colorado, United States

University-of-the-sunshine-coast, Australia

Yonsei University, South Korea

 

Companies Associated with COPD Research

Almirall, Spain

Amphastar Pharmaceuticals, Inc

AstraZeneca, Switzerland

Bayer, Germany

Beacon Pharmaceuticals

Biotie Therapies Corp

Bioxyne Limited

Boehringer Ingelheim, Germany

Chiesi Pharmaceutical, Italy

Cohero Health

Forest Laboratories, USA

Gecko Health, USA

Gsk, London

Inspiro Medical 

Kissei Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd

Lallemand Pharma, Switzerland

Merck & Co, USA

Novartis, Switzerland

Otsuka Holdings Co., Ltd

Panmira Pharmaceuticals, LLC

Pearl Therapeutics, Inc

PT Boehringer Ingelheim Indonesia

Queensland Respiratory Laboratory Pty. Ltd, Australia

Ranbaxy Laboratories Limited

Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc

Sunovion Pharmaceuticals, USA

Visionary Pharmaceuticals, Inc

Yungjin Pharm Ind. Co., Ltd

 

Market Research

 COPD market is estimated to currently be worth $11.3 billion, and is forecast to reach a value of $15.6 billion by 2019. Much of this growth will be fuelled by a high number of new, more efficacious and convenient products entering the market and commanding greater value compared to the therapies already in the market. The drugs driving this growth include once-daily LABA/LAMA fixed-dose combinations such as QVA-149, umeclidinium bromide/vilanterol and olodaterol/tiotropium. The asthma and COPD Therapies Market 2015-2025 report examines the current and future pharmaceutical treatments for these two respiratory diseases.With reported numbers for both asthma and COPD showing growth all over the world, understanding the market and the treatments available is crucial for all those in fields related to the sector. Currently, North America leads the global market for asthma & COPD drugs and devices. North America was followed by Europe in terms of market capitalization. However, North America and Europe is expected to lose out some of the market share to other emerging regional markets owing to the expiry of several patens of pharmaceutical companies operating in these regions. Asia Pacific is expected to be the fastest regional market for asthma and COPD owing to the increased incidence of asthma & other respiratory diseases in industrial regions.

 

 

COPD 2016

 COPD 2016 Report

COPD 2016 Past Conference Report

3rd International Conference on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease was held during July 11-12, 2016 at Brisbane, Australia. The conference was marked with the attendance of Editorial Board Members of supported Conference Series LLC Journals, Scientists, young and brilliant researchers, business delegates and talented student communities representing more than 20 countries, who made this conference fruitful and productive. This conference was based on the theme, “Novel Insights in Therapeutic Strategies on COPD” which included the following scientific tracks:

·   Lungs and its Functions; An Overview

·   Causes of COPD

·   Pathophysiology of COPD

·   COPD and Co-Morbidities

·   Drugs Acting on COPD

·   Clinical Evaluation of COPD

·    Diagnostics  Techniques of COPD

·    Developments in COPD Management

·    Advancement in Lung Surgeries

·     Control Measures for Prevention of COPD

We are thankful to our below Honourable Guests for their generous support and suggestions:

·  Joaquim Gea, Pompeu Fabra University, Spain.

·  Patrick Vanscheeuwijck, Philip Morris International R&D, Switzerland 

The conference proceedings were carried out through various scientific-sessions and plenary lectures, of which the following topics were highlighted as Keynote-presentations:

·Low physical activity and COPD: Prognosis and handling of this clinical problemgiven by Joaquim Gea, Pompeu Fabra University, Spain

·  Physiological Measures and Novel Sputum Biomarkers to Distinguish Subjects with Mild to Moderate COPD from Asymptomatic Current Smokers, Former Smokers and Never-Smokers presented by Patrick Vanscheeuwijck, Philip Morris International R&D, Switzerland 

 Various sessions were chaired and co-chaired by: Ping Yang, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, USA; Tsuyoshi Shuto, Kumamoto University, Japan; Phil Hansbro, University of Newcastle, Australia; Geertjan Wesseling, Maastricht UMC+, Netherlands. 

Conference Series LLC has taken the privilege of felicitating COPD-2016 Organizing Committee, Editorial Board Members and Keynote Speakers who supported for the success of this event.

The esteemed guests, Keynote speakers, well-known researchers and delegates shared their innovative research and vast experience through their fabulous presentations at the podium of grand COPD-2016. We are glad to inform that all accepted abstracts for the conference have been published in Conference Series LLC Journal of Pulmonary and Respiratory medicine as a special issue.

We are also obliged to various delegate experts, company representatives and other eminent personalities who supported the conference by facilitating active discussion forums. We sincerely thank the Organizing Committee Members for their gracious presence, support, and assistance. With the unique feedback from the conference, Conference Series LLC would like to announce the commencement of the "4th International Conference on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease" during May 29-31, 2017 in Osaka, Japan 

For more information please visit: http://copd.conferenceseries.com/

Let us meet again @ COPD-2017


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